Recent Fire Damage Posts

Preventing Duct Fires

11/18/2021 (Permalink)

Clothing dryers are one of the nation's leading causes of both residential and commercial fires. These fires are typically due to overwhelming amount of lint trapped in your exhaust duct. According to The Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 15,500 fires occur annually from clothes dryers. A study conducted by The U.S. Fire Administration reports the leading cause of these fires, is failure to clean the dryer vent. It is estimated that five deaths a year , over one hundred injures and thirty-five million dollars in damages incurred solely from improper care of your dryer vents. The combination of heat and accumulated dryer lint and dust are the leading causes of dryer fires . taking a few of these preventive steps will promote safety from dryer fires. 

  1. Continuously clean the lint screen. Every time you use your dryer verify that the lint screen is free of any lint
  2. inspect and maintain your exhaust pipe. If the vent pipe isn't exhausting any heat, it is time to assess your exhaust ducting
  3. keep your dryer in a working place , free from any clutter . Ensuring you have a dedicated area that is free of any dust lint or any loose clothing 
  4. check with load capacity on your dryer and do not overload it. 

If you experience fire damage please don't hesitate to call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park at (707)588-8226

Causes of Kitchen Fires

11/16/2021 (Permalink)

The kitchen is the source of many fire hazards because it's where heat, electricity, water and grease come together.  The most common type of fire is the grease fire.  A grease fire is extremely dangerous as it can get out of control quickly and spread from the stove throughout the kitchen and into other rooms of the house.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

  • Too high temperature in the fryer
  • Vegetable, more flammable, oils
  • Old, more flammable oil, in the deep fryer
  • Fat deposits in the flue and ventilation ducts
  • Misalignment sprinklers due to equipment moved around
  • Clogged melting links of the sprinklers leading to impaired function

Other types of kitchen fires include oven fire or the microwave.  When a fire starts, keep the door closed and turn off the oven.   The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames. If continues to smoke like a fire use a fire extinguisher or call fire department.

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at 707-665-0822.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened."

Thanksgiving Is Around The Corner

11/10/2021 (Permalink)

Turkey Day is almost here. Family, friends, good food and good times are what it is all about. Unfortunately, disaster can and do strike during the holiday. Grease fires, smoke from burnt food, and water damage from spills can dampen your spirits during a normally enjoyable event. This season, SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park askes you to take a few minutes to help avoid these possibilities. Here are just a few tips you can do to disaster proof you holiday.

  1. Check to make sure all smoke detectors are operating properly.
  2. Make sure you have fully charged fire extinguishers available in areas where cooking or open flames are present.
  3. Never leave cooking food unattended.
  4. Make sure you are in an open area clear of combustible if you are deep frying a turkey.

Do You Know How to Clean Up Fire Extinguisher Residue?

8/4/2021 (Permalink)

Home fires may be terrifying, whether they are caused by an overloaded extension cord or a kitchen flare-up. Quick-thinking homeowners, on the other hand, can efficiently deal with these unexpected emergencies. But, once the fire has been out and the household calms, how should the mess be cleaned up?

That depends on the fire extinguisher type. Every household fire extinguisher model is branded A, B, or C, indicating the types of fires it can put out. Ordinary combustibles such as wood, paper, and cloth are classified as A; flammable liquids such as gasoline or cooking oil are classified as B; and live electricity is classified as C. The label also reveals the “ingredients” that battle the fire within the canister. 

Most models contain a dry chemical that smothers the fire’s fuel with an inert solid because of their adaptability. After the extinguisher has been discharged, the solid settles over the area. Read the label to figure out what the powdery substance is, then put on gloves and a dust mask and clean up according to these guidelines:

Sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate: Vacuum thoroughly to remove all visible residue, making repeated passes over the affected areas. To neutralize the PH of the powder, use hot water mixed with a little vinegar. Allow for a few minutes of rest before rinsing with warm water.

Silicone types: Vacuum the residue thoroughly, making several passes to ensure that all visible residue is removed. To break down the silicone, spray the area with rubbing alcohol. Allow the solution to soak in for a few minutes before rinsing with warm water.

Monoammonium phosphate: Do not vacuum the monoammonium phosphate residue. The residue must be cleaned by hand as soon as possible; otherwise, it may cause further harm to sensitive electronics and other equipment. To begin, wipe away the residue using a clean towel. Clean using a mixture of warm water and baking soda on surfaces that may be wet washed. As needed, thoroughly dry and sanitize the area.

What happens if your fire extinguisher emits water or carbon dioxide? Both methods of cleanup are reasonably simple, but these compounds are used in very few home models nowadays. After turning off the electricity to the area, mopping is the best method for removing water. Carbon monoxide makes a minor mess that may not require special cleanup.

Finally, because that discharged fire extinguisher is only valid for one usage, replace it right away! Cleaning up after a fire? Turn to SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa, which has the most up-to-date technology and personnel to make any disaster “Like it never even happened.”

My Washing Machine Caught Fire in my Santa Rosa Home! What Now?

8/4/2021 (Permalink)

Fire damaged washing machine In this Santa Rosa home a fire was started by an electrical malfunction in the washing machine.

Recently, SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa performed a fire restoration job in Santa Rosa for a home affected by an electrical fire. The unthinkable happened as an explosion occurred due to faulty electrical wiring from a washing machine. After the initial assessment, it emerged the problem was down to an electrical fault, which meant the machine didn’t cut out when it had finished by instead grew dangerously overheated. Due to the severity of the explosion, the glass window resting behind the machine shattered, sending glass shards throughout the home. The fire-damaged washing machine was removed from the property. Nobody was injured during the incident, but the property sustained smoke damage throughout. The next phase of the job was thoroughly clean up the smoke and soot damage to the property.

Smoke damage is an essential step in the restoration process following a fire damage event. There are various ways to remove smoke residue, but getting the process started as quickly as possible will save you time and money.

What Strategies Does SERVPRO Use to Remove Smoke Residue?

There is no one-size-fits-all solution for removing soot and other dangerous residues from your home. The best methods differ based on the materials exposed, the location of the damage, and the thickness or severity of the residue. Clearing surfaces as quickly as possible is a key component of our SERVPRO team’s effective mitigation strategy. It allows us to avoid the need for extensive controlled demolition and to rebuild with the proper response to handle currently exposed materials. The following are some of the most effective residue strategies:

  • Water-Based Chemical Solvents
  • Abrasive Cleaning
  • Soda/Media Blasting
  • Controlled Demolition

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is slightly different, each requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions. We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your property. We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke or Soot Damage? Call Us Today at (707) 588-8226

Preventing an Electrical House Fire

6/1/2021 (Permalink)

Electricity can be found everywhere in a home, from the corners of rooms to kitchen cupboards. As a result, there is a substantial risk of damage. Electrical fires can cause significant damage to your house and jeopardize the safety of your family. The good news is that electrical fires can frequently be avoided. By being vigilant and knowledgeable about preventing electrical fires, you may feel safe in your home, knowing that you have taken the necessary precautions to prevent them entirely.

1. Ensure that all electrical outlets are securely attached to the wall. Begin by inspecting all your home's electrical outlets. As loose-fitting plugs can cause a shock or a fire hazard, make sure they are snug and secured to the wall.

  • Replace any wall plates that are cracked or missing and cover any unused outlets with a new wall plate to prevent exposed electrical wiring.

2. Electrical plugs should not be tampered with. To fit a plug into a two-conductor outlet, the third prong should never be removed. It is also a good idea not to bend or twist the prongs on the plug, as this can cause an electrical hazard.

  • Never try to force a plug into an outlet. Instead, slip the plug into and out the electrical plug by holding the covered top piece firmly. Pulling on the cord might wear it out and put you at risk of an electrical fire.

3. Surge protectors should be used. An electrical fire can be caused by overloading an outlet with too many plugs. Instead, get many surge protectors or power bars and install them in your home's electrical outlets. After then, only one to three cords should be plugged into the power bar at a time.

  • Look for power bars that have internal overload protection. If the power bar becomes overloaded, the internal overload protection will shut down, averting an electrical fire. 

4. Replace any electrical cords that are frayed or damaged. It would be best to inspect your electrical cords to make sure they are not frayed or broken. Replace them with new electrical cords if they are worn out. For a replacement cord, you may need to contact the appliance's manufacturer.

  • Double-check that the electrical plug is attached correctly to the power cord. Any exposed wiring components on the plug or cord should be avoided.

5. Extension cords should only be used on a temporary basis. Though using extension cords to extend the cords on your appliances or electronics may be appealing, they should only be used as a temporary solution. It is preferable if you do not use extension cords as your home's permanent electrical wiring. They can pose a serious electrical risk.

  • If you must use extension cords, be sure they are equipped with safety closures. This will keep small children from being shocked by power cords.

6. Electrical cords should be kept away from carpets and water. Electrical cords should not be hidden under carpets, rugs, or furniture. If they fray and encounter carpet or furniture, they could cause a fire. It would be beneficial if electrical cords were put in low-traffic places where they would not be stepped on or interfered with any way.

  • Keep any electrical cords away from water, as water can cause the cords to spark, resulting in an electrical fire.
  • Do not attach or staple electrical cords to walls, floors, or other objects, as this can cause an electrical hazard by interfering with the electrical current.

Contact Us When You Need Help

When you contact SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa at (707) 588-8226, you can be confident that your house will be cleaned and repaired by our team of specialists. We are accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to assist you with a fire damage event. 

Kitchen Fire Safety Tips for Your Petaluma Home

5/5/2021 (Permalink)

How to Prevent a Kitchen Fire in Your Petaluma Home

For many, the kitchen is a space to prepare meals that bring the family together, and for others, it is a space in their home that they are unfamiliar with. Regardless of your experience level in the kitchen, accidents can occur. You can help reduce your risk of a kitchen fire taking place by learning these kitchen safety tips. This will ensure your home is fully stocked with necessary fire safety equipment.

  1. Always Stay in the Kitchen When Cooking

Unattended cooking is the number one cause of home fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). If you are whipping up a meal on the stove or oven, an adult needs to remain in the kitchen to watch the food so it does not burn. It would help if you also used a timer when cooking to guarantee you do not lose your sense of time, which is a common cause for accidents.

  1. Keep the Kitchen Clutter-Free

Remove items that do not need to be in the kitchen to avoid any additional fire hazards. Additionally, be aware of flammable kitchen items that can rapidly catch fire, like oven mitts, wooden utensils, towels, curtains, or even excess food packaging, and do not place them near the stovetop.

  1. Unplug or Turn Off Your Appliances

Unplug any kitchen appliances when you are not using them, such as toasters and coffee machines. This will significantly reduce the occurrence of a fire. Turn off the appliance that you are using immediately after you finish cooking. It is also beneficial to wipe away leftover dust, food crumbs, and grease from your stove-top after use.

  1. Install Reliable Protection

Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of your home, outside of each sleeping area and in every bedroom. It is vital to remember to install smoke alarms at least 10 feet from cooking appliances. Remember that if you are cooking something that involves a lot of smoke, while it might be tempting to disable your house smoke alarms briefly, it can create an unsafe environment for you and your family. Moreover, test your alarms monthly to guarantee they are functioning correctly and replace the batteries every six months.

Fire extinguishers in your home should be placed on every level, as well as in the kitchen and garage. Keep your kitchen fire extinguisher nearby, allowing it to be more easily accessible in a fire event. Kitchen accidents happen but following these tips can allow you to protect your home and family.

Kitchen fires can happen fast, even when you are following all the proper precautions. If you experience a kitchen fire, contact SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa to help restore your kitchen to normal. We are here 24/7 to serve you! Call us at (707) 588-8226

Be Prepared for Wildfires

5/4/2021 (Permalink)

If you watch the TV or read the papers, you know it's time for the wildfires! As the heat rises, and the vegetation dries, we're only a spark away from disaster. Will you be ready?


If you live on a remote hillside, or in a valley, prairie or forest where flammable vegetation is plentiful, you could be vulnerable to wildfires. These fires are usually triggered by lightning or accidents.

1. Fire facts:

  • Once a fire starts in a rural area, it is hard to control. Wildland firefighters are trained to protect natural resources, not our homes or buildings. The fact that many homes are located far from fire stations, causes longer emergency response times. Within a matter of minutes, an entire home can be destroyed by fire. Limited water supply in rural areas can make fire fighting difficult. Homes that are secluded and surrounded by woods and brush fuel fires.

2. Be prepared and have a fire safety and evacuation plan:

  • Practice fire escape and evacuation plans.
  • Mark the entrance to your property with address signs that are clearly visible from the road.
  • Know which local emergency services to call and have those numbers posted near telephones.
  • Provide access for emergency vehicles at least 12 feet wide with turnaround space.

3. Tips for making your property fire resistant:

  • Keep lawns cut, leaves raked, and the roof and rain-gutters free from leaves and sticks.
  • Keep Stacked firewood at least 30 feet away from your home.
  • Store flammable things in metal containers outside the home at least 30 feet away from buildings and wooden fences.
  • Create a "defensible space" by thinning trees within 30 feet around your house.
  • Landscape with more fire resistant plants to prevent fire from spreading quickly. For example, hardwood trees are more fire-resistant than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus, or fir trees.
  • Make sure water sources, such as hydrants, ponds, swimming pools and wells, can be reached by the fire department.

4. Protect your home:

  • Use a fire resistant or protective roofing materials like stone, brick and metal to protect your home.
  • Cover all exterior vents, attics and eaves with metal mesh screens to prevent debris from collecting and to help keep sparks out.
  • Install multi-pane windows, tempered safety glass or fireproof shutters. This helps to protect large windows from heat.
  • Use fire-resistant draperies.
  • Have chimneys, wood stoves and all heating systems inspected and cleaned every year.
  • Insulate chimneys and place "spark arresters" on top.
    NOTE: The chimney should be at least three feet above the roof, and be sure to remove branches around the chimney, or any that hang over.

5. Follow local burning laws:

  • Do not burn trash or other yard waste without knowing local burning laws.
  • Before burning anything in a wooded area, make sure you notify local authorities and obtain a burning permit.
  • Use an approved incinerator with a safety lid or covering with holes no larger than 3/4 inches.
  • Create at least a 10-foot clearing before burning debris.
  • Have a fire extinguisher or garden hose on hand when burning.

6. If a wildfire threatens your home (and you have time), consider this:

Inside

  • Shut off gas at the meter. Turn off pilot lights.
  • Open fireplace damper. Close fireplace screens.
  • Close windows, vents, doors, blinds or noncombustible window coverings. Remove flammable drapes.
  • Move furniture into the center of the home away from windows and sliding-glass doors.
  • Close all interior doors and windows to prevent drafts.
  • Gather people and pets into one room. Make plans to care for your pets if you must evacuate.
  • Back your car into the garage or park it in an open space facing the direction of escape. Leave the key in the ignition and the car doors unlocked. Close garage windows and doors.

Outside

  • Seal attic and ground vents.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Place combustible patio furniture inside.
  • Connect garden hose to outside taps. Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above-ground fuel tanks. Wet the roof.
  • Wet or remove shrubs within 15 feet of the home.
  • Gather fire tools such as a rake, axe, handsaw or chainsaw, bucket, and shovel.

7. If you are advised to evacuate, do it! Don't wait. Choose a route away from the fire.

The secret of dealing with all disasters is being prepared!!! With a lot of thought and preparation, situations that may have been deadly, can often be dealt with safely.


Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Christine_E_Cederquist/8320 

3 Crucial Home Fire Safety Tips

4/6/2021 (Permalink)

Here are three tips from our team here at SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa to avoid a preventable fire and minimize your risks

1. Home Fire Prevention

  • Keep flammable materials away from heat sources. If you're using a portable space heater, keep it at least 3 feet away from flammable objects like furniture, blankets, electronics, or anything combustible.
  • Do not leave flames or smoke materials unattended, including fireplaces, stovetops, candles, and cigarettes.
  • Fix or replace frayed electrical cords or wires.
  • Do not overload wall outlets or extension cords.
  • Have your furnace or home heating source periodically inspected and kept in good working order.
  • Make sure everyone in the household understands the importance of home fire safety and observes fire-safe habits.

2. Home Fire Safety Equipment

  • Install smoke detectors on every floor of your home, in every bedroom, and outside each sleeping area.
  • Inspect and maintain your smoke detectors.
  • Learn how to use a fire extinguisher.
  • Consider installing an automatic sprinkler system in your home.

3. Fire Safety Planning

  • Create a fire safety plan that establishes at least two escape routes and a safe location away from the home where everyone can meet.
  • Make an emergency communications plan to stay in contact during and after a fire.
  • Practice your escape plan twice a year so everyone can act quickly when it counts.

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park/Santa Rosa in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke, or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration, and we are an IICRC Certified Firm. We believe in continuous training: from initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO's corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. 

Have Questions? Call us 24/7 - (707) 588-8226

Fire or Water Damage? We Have You Covered

11/19/2020 (Permalink)

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we provide 24-hour emergency service and are dedicated to being faster to any-sized disaster in Rohnert PArk, Cotati, Petaluma and surrounding cities! We can respond immediately to your emergency and have the expertise to handle your restoration or cleaning needs. We are:

  • 24-Hour Emergency Service
  • Faster to Any-Sized Disaster
  • Highly Trained Restoration Technicians
  • A Trusted Leader in the Restoration Industry
  • Locally Owned and Operated
  • Advanced Restoration and Cleaning Equipment

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (707) 665-0822

Residential Services

Whether your home needs emergency Fire Damage, Flood Damage or your upholstery cleaned, you can depend on us.  Our technicians have extensive cleaning and restoration training and can make your property look its best. Learn more about our residential services:

  • Water Damage Restoration
  • Fire Damage Restoration
  • Mold Remediation
  • Storm Damage Restoration
  • Cleaning Services
  • Building/Reconstruction Services

Commercial Services

There's never a convenient time for fire or Water damage to strike your Sonoma County commercial property. Every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. So when the need arises for fast professional cleaning or emergency restoration services we has the training and expertise to respond promptly with highly trained technicians to get your property back to business. Learn more about our commercial services by giving us a call today! 

Safety Tips After a Fire

11/17/2020 (Permalink)

Do not cut or walk past colored tape that was placed over doors or windows to mark damaged areas unless local authorities advise that it is safe to do so. If a building inspector has placed a color-coded sign on the home, do not enter it until you get more information, advice and instructions about what the sign means and whether it is safe to enter your home.

If you have children, leave them with a relative or friend while you conduct your first inspection of your home after the fire. The site may be unsafe for children, and seeing the damage firsthand may upset them and cause long-term effects, including nightmares.

Protect Yourself During a Power Outage

11/11/2020 (Permalink)

Power Outages

Extended power outages may impact the whole community and the economy. A power outage is when the electrical power goes out unexpectedly. A power outage may:

  • Disrupt communications, water and transportation.
  • Close retail businesses, grocery stores, gas stations, ATMs, banks and other services.
  • Cause food spoilage and water contamination.
  • Prevent use of medical devices.

PROTECT YOURSELF DURING A POWER OUTAGE:

  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed.
  • Use a generator, but ONLY outdoors and away from windows.
  • Do not use a gas stove and ovens to heat your home.
  • Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges.
  • Have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.
  • If safe, go to an alternate location for heat or cooling.
    • Check with your local officials for locations of cooling or warming centers. Locations may have changed this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • CDC has provided cooling shelter operators with guidance to help protect people from COVID-19. This guidance can be used for warming shelters, too.
    • If you go to a public cooling or warming center, keep at least six feet of space between you and individuals who are not a part of your immediate household.
    • Wear masks when in public spaces. Masks should not be worn by children under 2 years old, people who have trouble breathing, and people who are unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove them.
    • Try to bring items that can help protect you and others in the cooling or warming center from COVID-19, such as two masks for each person age two or older in the household, hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol, and cleaning materials.
    • Review the CDC’s guidelines for “Going to a Public Disaster Shelter During the COVID-19 Pandemic.
  • Be a good neighbor. Check on the welfare of others.
  • Sign up for email updates about coronavirus from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Follow the latest guidelines from the CDC and your local authorities to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Protect your Family and Home

8/5/2020 (Permalink)

Kitchen fire This fire originated in the kitchen.

House fire is a scary situation. It is a disaster that no one ever wants to experience in their life. As a fire restoration and cleaning company, what we come to realize is, many fires originate from the dryer. Here are some ways that you can prevent dryer fire from destroying your home.

  1. Always clean your lent screen before pushing the start button.
  2. Regularly clean your vent hose and make sure to check that they are in good shape. Try to keep the vent hose as short as possible to avoid clogging.
  3. Clean the vent line regularly to prevent clogging. If you are not able to clean the vent yourself, call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park. We have professionals who can quickly remove and restore your vent line.
  4. Keep the area around and behind your dryer clean and away from any material that can cause a fire.
  5. Regularly clean the lint inside of the dryer. Some dryers today may be more difficult to clean in which you'll need a technician help.
  6. If you have a gas dryer, make sure you check your gas line periodically. When in doubt, replace the gas line.

If you need professional assistance in cleaning out your vent line, call us today at 707-588-8226. We are "Here to Help".

Firing Up the Grill

8/5/2020 (Permalink)

With the warm weather, it's crucial that we are careful when a BBQ is in full swing. Being safe can help avoid fire and smoke damage that could result from carelessness. If something were to happen our SERVPRO team is ready to go to aid in fire damage loss and restoration. We also help with smoke cleanup in your property, whether it be your home or your place of business we can respond quickly and have a group ready to go shortly after we receive the call. It is important to know who to call when an emergency happens because you never know when disaster will strike.

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park is ready to help.  Call us at (707)588-8226

Be Prepared for the Wildfires

6/2/2020 (Permalink)

If you watch the TV or read the papers, you know it's time for the wildfires! As the heat rises, and the vegetation dries, we're only a spark away from disaster. Will you be ready?


If you live on a remote hillside, or in a valley, prairie or forest where flammable vegetation is plentiful, you could be vulnerable to wildfires. These fires are usually triggered by lightning or accidents.

1. Fire facts:

  • Once a fire starts in a rural area, it is hard to control. Wildland firefighters are trained to protect natural resources, not our homes or buildings. The fact that many homes are located far from fire stations, causes longer emergency response times. Within a matter of minutes, an entire home can be destroyed by fire. Limited water supply in rural areas can make fire fighting difficult. Homes that are secluded and surrounded by woods and brush fuel fires.

2. Be prepared and have a fire safety and evacuation plan:

  • Practice fire escape and evacuation plans.
  • Mark the entrance to your property with address signs that are clearly visible from the road.
  • Know which local emergency services to call and have those numbers posted near telephones.
  • Provide access for emergency vehicles at least 12 feet wide with turnaround space.

3. Tips for making your property fire resistant:

  • Keep lawns cut, leaves raked, and the roof and rain-gutters free from leaves and sticks.
  • Keep Stacked firewood at least 30 feet away from your home.
  • Store flammable things in metal containers outside the home at least 30 feet away from buildings and wooden fences.
  • Create a "defensible space" by thinning trees within 30 feet around your house.
  • Landscape with more fire resistant plants to prevent fire from spreading quickly. For example, hardwood trees are more fire-resistant than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus, or fir trees.
  • Make sure water sources, such as hydrants, ponds, swimming pools and wells, can be reached by the fire department.

4. Protect your home:

  • Use a fire resistant or protective roofing materials like stone, brick and metal to protect your home.
  • Cover all exterior vents, attics and eaves with metal mesh screens to prevent debris from collecting and to help keep sparks out.
  • Install multi-pane windows, tempered safety glass or fireproof shutters. This helps to protect large windows from heat.
  • Use fire-resistant draperies.
  • Have chimneys, wood stoves and all heating systems inspected and cleaned every year.
  • Insulate chimneys and place "spark arresters" on top.
    NOTE: The chimney should be at least three feet above the roof, and be sure to remove branches around the chimney, or any that hang over.

5. Follow local burning laws:

  • Do not burn trash or other yard waste without knowing local burning laws.
  • Before burning anything in a wooded area, make sure you notify local authorities and obtain a burning permit.
  • Use an approved incinerator with a safety lid or covering with holes no larger than 3/4 inches.
  • Create at least a 10-foot clearing before burning debris.
  • Have a fire extinguisher or garden hose on hand when burning.

6. If a wildfire threatens your home (and you have time), consider this:

Inside

  • Shut off gas at the meter. Turn off pilot lights.
  • Open fireplace damper. Close fireplace screens.
  • Close windows, vents, doors, blinds or noncombustible window coverings. Remove flammable drapes.
  • Move furniture into the center of the home away from windows and sliding-glass doors.
  • Close all interior doors and windows to prevent drafts.
  • Gather people and pets into one room. Make plans to care for your pets if you must evacuate.
  • Back your car into the garage or park it in an open space facing the direction of escape. Leave the key in the ignition and the car doors unlocked. Close garage windows and doors.

Outside

  • Seal attic and ground vents.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Place combustible patio furniture inside.
  • Connect garden hose to outside taps. Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above-ground fuel tanks. Wet the roof.
  • Wet or remove shrubs within 15 feet of the home.
  • Gather fire tools such as a rake, axe, handsaw or chainsaw, bucket, and shovel.

7. If you are advised to evacuate, do it! Don't wait. Choose a route away from the fire.

The secret of dealing with all disasters is being prepared!!! With a lot of thought and preparation, situations that may have been deadly, can often be dealt with safely.


Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Christine_E_Cederquist/8320 

Include Your Pets in your Fire Safety Plan

5/5/2020 (Permalink)

Dog chewing electric cables Chewed up cables can cause a fire

Our pets are part of our family. Some consider their dogs and cats to be children. They provide companionship and add joy to our lives. It is not something we like to think about, but keeping our pets safe during a fire or natural disaster is something we must prepare for. A home fire is the most top of mind event we can prepare for through prevention and safety awareness. In fact, fire kills more people in the US than all natural disasters combined with over 1.6 million fires in 2007. However, there are many other emergencies that can separate pets from their owners, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods. It is important to keep our pets and families safe by being prepared.

Fires can occur through a variety of causes including candles, natural disasters, lightning, smoking, Christmas trees, electrical, gas leaks, fireworks, space heaters, arson etc. However the top causes for home fires (38%) are from cooking and heating accidents, according to the USFA. In fact, December, January and February are top months due to colder weather. In the spring and summer months, lightning fires are more prevalent.

According to the NFPA, a home fire is reported every 79 seconds to a fire department and 4 out of every 5 fire deaths result from home fires. Only 25% of home fires occur at night, so many occur during the day when you are not home with your pets.

Some things to prevent and prepare your home and pets from fire and natural disasters:

  • Install and frequently check smoke alarms, chimneys, grills, etc.
  • Keep pets away from candles, grills, open flames, etc and never leave a home and pet unattended with an open flame. Keep flammable items such as dishtowels and oven mitts away from what you are cooking.
  • Make sure neighbors know you and your pets, and that they have an emergency number for you and your vet's number. If you feel comfortable, give them a key and your alarm code.
  • Have a plan. Decide in advance how your family will handle a fire or disaster and review often, including how to handle the pets. This includes having a plan for animals that are in crates or confined to a room while you are away.
  • Have a doggie or kitty door installed.
  • Keep an emergency supply kit and include pet items such as food or medication, vaccination records, leashes and a favorite toy to comfort your pet.
  • Make sure your animals wear ID tags and/or are micro chipped in case they get separated from your family or get spooked and separated from your home.
  • Clearly mark the front and back entrances with a Pet Safety sticker to alert emergency workers that there are pets inside your house. 

Keeping your furry friends happy and healthy by including them in your fire safety plans. More safety and prevention tips can be found online at the NFPA and the AKC.

Remember if you need help with fire restoration please call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park at  (707)665-0822

Fire Safety Plan for Kids

4/30/2020 (Permalink)

Structure damage after a fire Fire damage affected entire home.

Fires don't occur often in homes, thankfully, but when they do, everyone must know what to do. There won't be time to check a manual or read a book. The family must know immediately what to do and do it! To make that happen, there must be a fire safety plan in place, and the family must have rehearsed it.

The Fire Safety Plan

The plan itself should provide for two ways out of the house. This isn't too difficult when everyone's on the ground floor, but a second story is a little different. Remember that a fire or smoke may block the only stairway. Buy and install an emergency ladder with metal steps. Secured beneath a window, it can easily be lowered out of that window so that family members can climb to the ground. Once on the ground, children and adults alike should move to a designated meeting point that is safely away from the burning house. This allows parents and fire fighters to determine who is safe and who still needs assistance. It's important to get to the meeting point because we definitely don't want a fire fighter to risk his or her life by entering a burning home when it's not necessary.

Special Fire Safety Precautions

If you or a child are in a room behind a closed door, be sure to touch the door knob quickly before leaving the room. If the knob is hot, there is fire or hot smoke and gases in the hallway. Rather than entering a hall full of fire, plug the crack at the base of the door with a towel or piece of clothing to keep the smoke confined to the hallway. Then, hang a bed sheet or towel out of the window to let the fire department know that you need help.

Long before an emergency ever occurs, smoke detectors should be installed throughout the house. This is especially important on sleeping floors. When a child is lost in a home fire, it is usually because there were no working smoke detectors in the structure and the child slept through the developing fire. In order to depend upon them, fire detectors must be tested monthly and the batteries must be changed every six months. Let kids hear the alarm so they know it and will react to it. Change batteries when daylight savings time makes its changes.

Every home should have at least one fire extinguisher in the kitchen. Provide a second one in the garage. Check each one monthly to ensure it has pressure, and have them serviced each year. This ensures the unit will be ready to perform when you need it. Learn how to use the fire extinguisher and then show everyone else in the family how to use it. While you are desperately trying to put out that nasty grease fire on the stove is no time to learn to use an extinguisher.

Place plenty of flashlights, usually one for each bedroom, and spare batteries throughout the house. If the house begins to fill with smoke or there is a power outage in the middle of the night, each child is able to find their way out. Likewise, each bedroom and the kitchen should have emergency numbers posted, especially 911. Arrange to take your kids to the local fire station so that they can meet a real fire fighter. This will help to reduce the "scary image" created by a fire fighter in full fire fighting gear in a dark, smoke-filled hallway.

Child Fire Safety Exiting Plans

As cold-hearted as it sounds, encourage kids to get out of the house immediately without looking for family pets. To search through a smoke-filled house or apartment to find a dog or a cat can put a child at serious risk. Animals often find their way out, and more than one pet has been saved by a fire fighter.

Teach children to crawl out of a smoke-filled room or hallway. Hot smoke and gases rise to the ceiling, so the available oxygen is near the floor. If a child's clothing catches on fire, as it might in a cooking fire, teach your family to stop, drop and roll. This reduces the oxygen available to the burning clothing and puts out the fire.

Ensure every family member makes it out safely by developing and practicing a home fire safety plan. Provide two exits for every room and make sure kids know how to use them as well as fire extinguishers, emergency telephone numbers and flashlights. Check smoke alarms monthly. Teach everyone to stop, drop and roll in order to put out a clothing fire.

Thanks for reading our article. If you'd like to read more on child safety, please join http://childhealthandsafetymagazine.com.

While every attempt has been made to ensure that the information presented here is correct, contents and any links are not warranted for accuracy or any other implied or explicit purposes and are for information only.

If you are in need of fire restoration please call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park at 707-665-0822

5 Safety Tips for your Fire Escape Plan

11/19/2019 (Permalink)

A brown wooden background with five silver bars that make the five symbol in Roman numerals. The Number Five in Roman Numerals

October is Fire Prevention Month and our team at SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park have followed these safety tips shared by the National Fire Protection Association through this year’s National Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!”

Please be safe and follow these tips so that you and your family can escape the fire safely.

  1. It is important to know the layout of your home. Make an escape plan by drawing a map that shows all your windows and doors, which could potentially be your exit strategy.

Fact: One-third of American households who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire becomes life threatening. Unfortunately, the time available could be as little as one to two minutes, according to Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy.

  1. Know at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside can be easily opened.

Fact: A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire. Make sure to close all doors behind you when exiting a room. Also, check to make sure a door is not hot, that can be an indicator of a fire on the other side.

  1. Have an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole or mailbox) a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.

Fact: Escape planning and practice can help reduce the time to get everyone out. It is best to call the Fire Department when outside your home.

  1. Practice your escape plan during the day and night with everyone in your home at least twice a year using different ways out. Be extra mindful to teach children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them.

Fact: While 71% of Americans have an escape plan in case of a fire, only 47% of those have practiced it.

  1. If the smoke alarm sounds, your first thought should be to get out. Never go back inside for people or pets.

Fact: Only 8% said that their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out. Smoke inhalation is also very dangerous. If you need to go through smoke, get low and go under the smoke till you reach your way out.

For more information or resources regarding fire, electrical, or related hazards, please feel free to visit the National Fire Protection Association at https://www.nfpa.org/.

Ten Things I Needed During a Power Outage

11/12/2019 (Permalink)

The number ten in big black bold font inside of a yellow circle background. The number 10

The month of October was a time of turmoil and unpredictability. The Kincade fire was spreading at an alarming rate and if it wasn’t for the brave firefighters who came from all over the nation to help, there would have been more destruction than what happened. PG&E took preventative measures by shutting off the power in many counties in the bay area. I live in Marin County and my job is in Sonoma. Both locations underwent a blackout for multiple days. During the outage, there were essential items that I wish I had to make the process easier. This is a list that I have compiled from the least to most importance, so that next time I can be prepared and perhaps you could be too.

10. First Aid Kit: Bottom of the list but still an essential item. Not needed for just a power outage but in general for your safety.

9. Powered Portable Charger(s): I realized that having my phone charged was a necessity at times to receive notifications about the fire and to call family members who are experiencing a power outage as well.

8. Batteries: These guys come in handy for a multitude of reasons. Especially if you want access to any electrical item that could use batteries for a charge or for the next item listed.

7. Flashlight: The Night came quickly and before we all knew it, everything was pitch black. Making it difficult to move around. Having a flashlight (especially LED because they last longer) is an essential item that can save you from falling or hurting yourself.

6. Gas: Many of my family members and co-workers were worried to drive for too long, especially in the traffic due to the evacuees leaving the dangers of the fires. Gas stations were generally closed with the next station being about 40 minutes away. Having a car is needed just in case we need to rush to loved ones or evacuate from the fire ourselves.

5. Cooler: A cooler is a great place to store your refrigerated goods. Most people I know had to throw away their week’s supply of groceries. Not only did it cost a lot of money to replace when the power came back, but we were left without any fresh food. Therefore, having a large cooler would be an important item for the preservation of food. Of course, this would only work with the next item on my list.

4. Manual Can opener: A can opener is an important tool to open cans storing unperishable foods. This is a lifesaver and keeps you from having to buy food out in neighboring counties where the lines were incredibly long in some cases. Save yourself the drive and the money.

3. Ice: Everything else on the list are items that you can buy and store until you need them. However, Ice is trickier because it doesn’t last long unless you take up space with a bagful in your freezer. Therefore, when an outage occurs this may be not only the most important item to have but also the most difficult to acquire. For example, I was in the city of San Francisco which is 40 minutes away without traffic and even in the stores in the city was it hard to find ice. Most stores were emptied out because the millions of people knew of the value ice had during this time. This is the most difficult to have but if you have a chance to buy some while an outage is announced by PG&E, my advice is to go buy some asap.

2. Canned or unperishable foods: Just in case you do not have access to a cooler or some ice. Having canned foods or snacks like bars, nuts, or candy could go a long way in keeping you sustained for a while. We didn’t know how long the power was going to be out, but we might as well not go hungry in the process.

1. Bottled Water: We need water to survive and this was an item that was not rare to find like ice but was still highly sought after during the power outage. Preferably not in plastic containers but if presented with an emergency, then it is better to have access to this resource more than any other item on this list and why I have it as my number one choice.

Again, thank you to the first responders and be safe everyone.

Protect your family and home

8/6/2019 (Permalink)

House fire is a scary situation. It is a disaster that no one ever wants to experience in their life. As a fire restoration and cleaning company, what we come to realize is, many fires originate from the dryer. Here are some ways that you can prevent dryer fire from destroying your home.

  1. Always clean your lent screen before pushing the start button.
  2. Regularly clean your vent hose and make sure to check that they are in good shape. Try to keep the vent hose as short as possible to avoid clogging.
  3. Clean the vent line regularly to prevent clogging. If you are not able to clean the vent yourself, call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park. We have professionals who can quickly remove and restore your vent line.
  4. Keep the area around and behind your dryer clean and away from any material that can cause a fire.
  5. Regularly clean the lint inside of the dryer. Some dryers today may be more difficult to clean in which you'll need a technician help.
  6. If you have a gas dryer, make sure you check your gas line periodically. When in doubt, replace the gas line.

If you need professional assistance in cleaning out your vent line, call us today at 707-588-8226. We are "Here to Help".

Essential Safety Tips When Grilling

8/6/2019 (Permalink)

Outdoor grilling is such a popular method of cooking these days that it is easy to forget that outdoor grills can be very dangerous. In this article I am going to cover some essential safety tips that when followed, will keep you and your family safe during the grilling season.

  • Check Your Grill - This is especially important if your grill has not been used for some time. It is important to check your grill for wear and damage, this applies to both gas grills and charcoal grills. If you have a gas grill then remember to check that the rubber gas hose that connects to your gas cylinder is in good condition.
  • Grill Positioning - Place your grill on a solid, level surface, well away from any flammable material and ideally a good 3 meters from any structure.
  • Never leave a lit grill unattended. - The Fire can quickly and easily rage out of control, and remember that charcoal can burn at very high temperatures.
  • Never allow children or pets to play or run around your grilling area. A knocked over grill can cause severe burn injuries.
  • Never use any kind of accelerant to assist in the lighting of your grill. If you have a gas grill and it does not have an automatic ignition system, then a long handled butane lighter is ideal. If you have a charcoal grill then why not try a chimney starter for ease of lighting.
  • Do not wear loose fitting clothing that is likely to dangle into the fire and catch light. A pair of heat resistant grilling gloves or mitts are a great way of protecting your hands and lower arms.
  • Use long handled grilling tools whilst cooking. This will allow you to reach all areas of the grill without burning your hands. Try and avoid tools made of nylon and other materials that could easily melt.
  • Invest in a grilling thermometer. This will ensure your meat and poultry are cooked right through.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher or a spray bottle of water close to hand. A grill fire can quickly get out of hand - especially when using a charcoal grill. If food drips too much fat and juice onto the fire this can result in a flare up. Usually water from a spray bottle is sufficient to reduce a flare up.
  • Make sure all plates, boards, knives and other utensils that have come into contact with raw fish, meat or poultry are washed properly.
  • When you have finished grilling, ensure the grill is fully cooled before moving it. If you have a charcoal grill, make sure the coals are completely cooled before you empty them


Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rachel_Wade/649494 

5 Important Summer Grilling Safety Tips

6/19/2019 (Permalink)

Summer is around the corner and many people are anxiously ready for planning to cook outdoors. However, while grilling and hosting barbecue parties can be a lot of fun, it's important to make sure you follow a few safety guidelines to ensure that you and your guests have the best possible experience. The worst thing that could happen during your picnic would be if someone needed to go to the emergency room or the fire department has to be called!

Here are 5 very important summer grilling tips to follow to ensure the safety of you and your guests:

1. Grill From a Distance: Grilling too close to houses, decks, fences, bushes, or trees can greatly increase your risk of a fire while cooking outside. A minimum safe distance should be 5 feet, with 10 feet or more recommended. When you are making foods such as hamburgers or steaks that can drip grease and fat it can cause many flames to shoot up from the grill. You will also want to make sure there are no nearby flammable objects or materials, such as extra propane tanks or aerosol cans. You should never grill indoors or in a garage or covered porch area as this can also be a fire risk. The only things that should be nearby are your cooking necessities and a fire extinguisher!

2. Keep Kids and Pets Safe: A hot grill can be very dangerous to children and animals, especially since they may not realize that it can potentially burn them. Keep kids and pets as far away from the grill as possible and have another adult keep them occupied during cooking to make sure they don't accidentally bump into the grill.

3. Protect Your Body: It is very easy for grease to splatter when cooking, and anytime you are working near a hot surface you will want to make sure that you take precautions to minimize your risk for burns. Using special matches or lighters for your grill, long handled tongs, and heat resistant oven mitts will all help your skin stay safe while barbecuing outside. Make sure your clothes are not too loose also - hanging sleeves or a baggy shirt could easily catch on fire inadvertently.

4. Never Leave the Grill Unattended: It only takes a minute away from your grilling station for something to go terribly wrong. Never when cooking outdoors leave the area. Make sure before you start that you have everything you need including the food, dishes, utensils, seasonings, and maybe even a drink for yourself while you are working.

5. Follow the Manufacturer Recommendations: Different models will have different features and specifications. Be sure that you completely understand the user manual and directions and follow any other additional safety information that comes with your equipment. You should also make sure that you perform regular cleaning and maintenance. Inspect the parts and pieces before use for leaks if using gas or propane and if necessary call a licensed person to repair.

Following these simple safety tips will help prevent injury to you, your guests, or your property. Taking just a few minutes to do these things can reduce your risk and make sure that your barbecue party is a safe and enjoyable one!

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/M._Stein/307480 

Include Your Pets in Your Fire Safety Plans

5/6/2019 (Permalink)

Our pets are part of our family. Some consider their dogs and cats to be children. They provide companionship and add joy to our lives. It is not something we like to think about, but keeping our pets safe during a fire or natural disaster is something we must prepare for. A home fire is the most top of mind event we can prepare for through prevention and safety awareness. In fact, fire kills more people in the US than all natural disasters combined with over 1.6 million fires in 2007. However, there are many other emergencies that can separate pets from their owners, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods. It is important to keep our pets and families safe by being prepared.

Fires can occur through a variety of causes including candles, natural disasters, lightening, smoking, Christmas trees, electrical, gas leaks, fireworks, space heaters, arson etc. However the top causes for home fires (38%) are from cooking and heating accidents, according to the USFA. In fact, December, January and February are top months due to colder weather. In the spring and summer months, lightening fires are more prevalent.

According to the NFPA, a home fire is reported every 79 seconds to a fire department and 4 out of every 5 fire deaths result from home fires. Only 25% of home fires occur at night, so many occur during the day when you are not home with your pets.

Some things to prevent and prepare your home and pets from fire and natural disasters:

  • Install and frequently check smoke alarms, chimneys, grills, etc.
  • Keep pets away from candles, grills, open flames, etc and never leave a home and pet unattended with an open flame. Keep flammable items such as dishtowels and oven mitts away from what you are cooking.
  • Make sure neighbors know you and your pets, and that they have an emergency number for you and your vet's number. If you feel comfortable, give them a key and your alarm code.
  • Have a plan. Decide in advance how your family will handle a fire or disaster and review often, including how to handle the pets. This includes having a plan for animals that are in crates or confined to a room while you are away.
  • Have a doggie or kitty door installed.
  • Keep an emergency supply kit and include pet items such as food or medication, vaccination records, leashes and a favorite toy to comfort your pet.
  • Make sure your animals wear ID tags and/or are micro chipped in case they get separated from your family or get spooked and separated from your home.

Keeping your furry friends happy and healthy by including them in your fire safety plans. More safety and prevention tips can be found online at the NFPA and the AKC.

Sources: USFA, NFPA, AKC, NFPA 2007 Fire statistics



Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Carol_Perry/223292

Home Fire Safety Plan For Kids

5/6/2019 (Permalink)

Fires don't occur often in homes, thankfully, but when they do, everyone must know what to do. There won't be time to check a manual or read a book. The family must know immediately what to do and do it! To make that happen, there must be a fire safety plan in place, and the family must have rehearsed it.

The Fire Safety Plan

The plan itself should provide for two ways out of the house. This isn't too difficult when everyone's on the ground floor, but a second story is a little different. Remember that a fire or smoke may block the only stairway. Buy and install an emergency ladder with metal steps. Secured beneath a window, it can easily be lowered out of that window so that family members can climb to the ground. Once on the ground, children and adults alike should move to a designated meeting point that is safely away from the burning house. This allows parents and fire fighters to determine who is safe and who still needs assistance. It's important to get to the meeting point because we definitely don't want a fire fighter to risk his or her life by entering a burning home when it's not necessary.

Special Fire Safety Precautions

If you or a child are in a room behind a closed door, be sure to touch the door knob quickly before leaving the room. If the knob is hot, there is fire or hot smoke and gases in the hallway. Rather than entering a hall full of fire, plug the crack at the base of the door with a towel or piece of clothing to keep the smoke confined to the hallway. Then, hang a bed sheet or towel out of the window to let the fire department know that you need help.

Long before an emergency ever occurs, smoke detectors should be installed throughout the house. This is especially important on sleeping floors. When a child is lost in a home fire, it is usually because there were no working smoke detectors in the structure and the child slept through the developing fire. In order to depend upon them, fire detectors must be tested monthly and the batteries must be changed every six months. Let kids hear the alarm so they know it and will react to it. Change batteries when daylight savings time makes its changes.

Every home should have at least one fire extinguisher in the kitchen. Provide a second one in the garage. Check each one monthly to ensure it has pressure, and have them serviced each year. This ensures the unit will be ready to perform when you need it. Learn how to use the fire extinguisher and then show everyone else in the family how to use it. While you are desperately trying to put out that nasty grease fire on the stove is no time to learn to use an extinguisher.

Place plenty of flashlights, usually one for each bedroom, and spare batteries throughout the house. If the house begins to fill with smoke or there is a power outage in the middle of the night, each child is able to find their way out. Likewise, each bedroom and the kitchen should have emergency numbers posted, especially 911. Arrange to take your kids to the local fire station so that they can meet a real fire fighter. This will help to reduce the "scary image" created by a fire fighter in full fire fighting gear in a dark, smoke-filled hallway.

Child Fire Safety Exiting Plans

As cold-hearted as it sounds, encourage kids to get out of the house immediately without looking for family pets. To search through a smoke-filled house or apartment to find a dog or a cat can put a child at serious risk. Animals often find their way out, and more than one pet has been saved by a fire fighter.

Teach children to crawl out of a smoke-filled room or hallway. Hot smoke and gases rise to the ceiling, so the available oxygen is near the floor. If a child's clothing catches on fire, as it might in a cooking fire, teach your family to stop, drop and roll. This reduces the oxygen available to the burning clothing and puts out the fire.

Ensure every family member makes it out safely by developing and practicing a home fire safety plan. Provide two exits for every room and make sure kids know how to use them as well as fire extinguishers, emergency telephone numbers and flashlights. Check smoke alarms monthly. Teach everyone to stop, drop and roll in order to put out a clothing fire.

Thanks for reading our article. If you'd like to read more on child safety, please join [http://childhealthandsafetymagazine.com]

While every attempt has been made to ensure that the information presented here is correct, contents and any links are not warranted for accuracy or any other implied or explicit purposes and are for information only.



 Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Robert_G._Holt/618972

Facts about Holidays fire

12/12/2018 (Permalink)

Holidays are here and the U.S Fire Administration has some facts we at SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park find really import to share:

  • One of every four home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 32 reported home Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 143 total reported home fires.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every four Christmas tree fires.
  • The top three days for home candle fires are Christmas, New Year’s Day, and Christmas Eve.
  • Candles start two out of five home decoration structure fires.

Content Source:

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/holiday.html

Is Cooking Dangerous?

12/6/2018 (Permalink)

The answer is NO! But cooking is the number 1 cause of fires in homes.

We all love a good meal and with the Holidays coming we hope you all have great meals coming out safe of your kitchens. We brought you information about how to be even safer.

First most fires in the kitchen are man-made, so keep an eye while in the kitchen. here are some safety tips:

House fires happen most during dinner hours—between 5:00 and 8:00 p.m.

  • For grease fires, only use a fire extinguisher (class B) or baking soda. Do not use water! It will spread the oil/grease and make your fire worse.
  • Never leave your food unattended. Fires only need 30 seconds to go from a small flame to an out-of-control blaze, so even going to the bathroom could endanger your home.
  • Turn off the stove and all appliances once you’re done cooking.
  • Keep everything off hot surfaces. For instance, don’t throw a dish towel on top of the stove, because it could still be hot!
  • Don’t wear baggy clothing. It could catch fire accidentally.
  • Keep the grill at least 10 feet from vegetation and the house.

And remember, we at SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park are here to help in case of emergency to make it "Like it never even happened."

Content source: 

https://www.safewise.com/blog/the-most-common-places-that-fires-occur-in-the-home/

FIRE SAFETY IN MANUFACTURED HOMES

8/20/2018 (Permalink)

About manufactured homes
Manufactured homes (sometimes called "mobile" homes) are transportable structures that are fixed to a chassis and specifically designed to be towed to a residential site. They are not the same as modular or prefabricated homes, which are factory-built and then towed in sections to be installed at a permanent location.

In order to distinguish between modular, prefabricated and recreational trailer homes, the following definition for a manufactured home from NFPA 501, Standard on Manufactured Housing, applies:

A structure, transportable in one or more sections that in the traveling mode is 8 body-ft (2.4 m) or more in width or 40 body-ft (12.2 m) or more in length or that on site is 320 ft2 (29.7m2) or more, is built on a permanent chassis, is designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation, whether or not connected to the utilities, and includes plumbing, heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems contained therein. Such terms shall include any structure that meets all the requirements of this paragraph except the size requirements and with respect to which the manufacturer voluntarily files a certification required by the regulatory agency. Calculations used to determine the number of square feet in a structure are based on the structure’s exterior dimensions, include all expandable rooms, cabinets, and other projections containing interior space, but do not include bay windows.

The federal government regulates the construction of manufactured housing. Since 1976, manufactured homes have been required to comply with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) manufactured housing construction and safety standards, which cover a wide range of safety requirements, including fire safety. Post-1976 manufactured homes bear a label certifying compliance with these standards.

The HUD standard has been enhanced over the years and the HUD "Final Rule" for smoke alarms in manufactured homes is largely based upon NFPA 501. Today, new construction of manufactured housing is required to contain, among other provisions:

  • factory installed hard wired or 10 year battery source, interconnected smoke alarms with battery back-up (including alarms inside or immediately adjacent to all rooms designated as sleeping areas, top of the stairs and on the basement ceiling near the stairs)
  • provisions for special devices for hearing and visually impaired persons.

NFPA's national fire data indicate that manufactured homes built to HUD standards (post-1976 construction) have a much lower risk of death if fire occurs compared to pre-standard manufactured homes. The latest data (2007-2011) also shows that the overall fire death rate per 100,000 housing units is roughly the same for manufactured homes and for other one- or two-family homes.

Despite the federal requirements for factory-installed smoke alarms and the fact that eight out of ten manufactured homes now are and seven out of ten manufactured home fires now involve post-HUD-Standard units (based on 2007-2011 data), 51 percent of fires in manufactured homes were reported as having no smoke alarms present. This suggests a problem with detection devices being removed by occupants.

Safety tips
To increase fire safety in manufactured homes, NFPA offers the following guidelines:

  • Choose a HUD-certified manufactured home
    If you are in the market to purchase or rent a manufactured home, select a home built after 1976 that bears the HUD label certifying compliance with safety standards.
  • Keep smoke alarms working
    Never remove or disable a smoke alarm. If you experience frequent nuisance alarms, consider relocating the alarm further away from kitchen cooking fumes or bathroom steam. Selecting a photoelectric smoke alarm for the areas nearest kitchens and baths may reduce the number of nuisance alarms experienced. As an alternative, NFPA 501 permits a smoke alarm with a silencing means to be installed if it is within 20 feet of a cooking appliance. Test all smoke alarms at least once a month by pushing the "test" button. It is not necessary to use smoke or a real flame to test the smoke alarm's operability, and it is risky to do so. Replace batteries at least once a year, and when the alarm "chirps," signaling low battery power. Occasionally dust or lightly vacuum smoke alarms.
  • Make sure you have enough smoke alarms
    If your older manufactured home does not have smoke alarms in or near every sleeping room and in or near the family/living area(s), immediately install new alarms and fresh batteries to protect these rooms.  For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • Plan your escape
    Know ahead of time how you will get out if you have a fire. Develop an escape plan which includes having an alternate exit out of every room. Make sure you can open and get out of windows and doors. All post-HUD Standard manufactured homes are required to provide windows designed for use as secondary escape routes for the bedroom. Familiarize yourself with their operation and don't block access to them.  Immediately fix any windows that have been painted or nailed shut, doors that are stubborn or "stuck," and locks that are difficult to operate. Security bars or grates over windows or doors should have quick-release devices installed inside, which allow you to open them in an emergency. Hold a fire drill twice a year to rehearse how you will react if the smoke alarm sounds.
  • Electrical
    Hire a licensed electrician if you notice flickering lights, frequent blown circuits, or a "hot" smell when using electricity. Use extension cords for temporary convenience, not as a permanent solution. Avoid overloading electrical receptacles (outlets). Electrical cords should not be run under carpets or rugs, as the wires can be damaged by foot traffic, then overheat and ignite the carpet or rug over them. Ground-fault circuit interrupters reduce the risk of electrical shock and should be installed by electricians in kitchens and baths. Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters monitor electric circuits for arcing and should be installed by electricians on bedroom circuits.
  • Cooking
    Unattended cooking is the leading cause of cooking fires in U.S. homes. Supervise older children who cook and stay in the kitchen when heating anything on the stove. Keep cooking surfaces clean and place anything that can burn well away from the range. Heat oil slowly and know how to slide a lid over a pan if you experience a grease fire. Read more cooking safety tips.
  • Heating
    Keep space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn. When purchasing new space heaters, select appliances with automatic shut-off switches. Kerosene heaters are illegal for home use in some jurisdictions. Check with your local fire department before purchasing a kerosene heater. Turn off portable space heaters before falling asleep or when leaving the room. Refill kerosene heaters outdoors, after the heater has cooled down. Supervise children and pets when space heaters are operating. Read more heating safety tips.
  • Walls
    All post-HUD Standard manufactured homes are required to have wall linings that do not promote rapid flame spread, with special protection around primary heating and cooking equipment, such as the furnace and cooking range. Presently, gypsum wallboard has replaced plywood wall paneling and wood based ceiling panels in the fabrication of manufactured housing walls and ceilings. This action has dramatically reduced the impact of fires in manufactured homes. Do not mount anything on the walls – such as paneling, drapery, or wall hangings – that would reduce this protection, especially near major heat sources.
  • Smoking
    If you have smokers in your home, ask them to smoke outside. Wherever people smoke, set out large, non-tip ashtrays on level surfaces and empty them frequently. Thoroughly douse butts with water before discarding. Check around and under cushions for smoldering butts. Read more smoking safety tips.
  • Protect yourself from intruders
    Install outdoor lighting to deter intruders, including would-be arsonists. Keep gasoline, charcoal lighter and other flammable liquids locked in an outdoor shed. Don't store items underneath your home. Store firewood away from your home and keep trash and other flammable debris cleaned up. Report any suspicious activity in your neighborhood.

http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/escape-planning/fire-safety-in-manufactured-homes

Smoke and Soot Cleanup

8/13/2018 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – (707) 588-8226

Causes of Kitchen Fires

5/24/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park (707) 588-8226

The kitchen is the source of many fire hazards because it's where heat, electricity, water and grease come together.  The most common type of fire is the grease fire.  A grease fire is extremely dangerous as it can get out of control quickly and spread from the stove throughout the kitchen and into other rooms of the house.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

  • Too high temperature in the fryer
  • Vegetable, more flammable, oils
  • Old, more flammable oil, in the deep fryer
  • Fat deposits in the flue and ventilation ducts
  • Misalignment sprinklers due to equipment moved around
  • Clogged melting links of the sprinklers leading to impaired function

Other types of kitchen fires include oven fire or the microwave.  When a fire starts, keep the door closed and turn off the oven.   The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames. If continues to smoke like a fire use a fire extinguisher or call fire department.

At SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at (707) 588-8226.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened!"

Pet Fire Safety Tips

5/24/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park (707) 588-8226
  • Pets are curious. They may bump into, turn on, or knock over cooking equipment. Keep pets away from stoves and counter tops
  • Keep pets away from candles, lamps, and space heaters.
  • Always use a metal or heat-tempered glass screen on a fireplace and keep it in place.
  • Keep pets away from a chimney’s outside vents. Have a “pet-free zone” of at least 3 feet (1 meter) away from the fireplace. Glass doors and screens can stay dangerously hot for several hours after the fire goes out.
  • Consider battery-operated, flameless candles. They can look and smell like real candles.
  • Some pets are chewers. Watch pets to make sure they don’t chew through electrical cords. Have any problems checked by a professional.
  • Have working smoke alarms on every level of the home. Test your smoke alarms at least once a month.
  • If the smoke alarm sounds, get out and stay out.
  • Never go back inside for pets in a fire. Tell firefighters if your pet is trapped.

At SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at (707) 588-8226.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened!"

SERVPRO’s Tips to Prevent Fire Damage in Your Home

12/13/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO recommends never leaving a portable heater unattended in your home.

Space heaters can be a great way to warm up the coldest areas of your house throughout the harshest of winter months. They are not without their potential threats, however. Monitoring them carefully and not leaving these heaters running unattended can help prevent unnecessary damage to your home, let alone those who live inside of it.

Electric and gas space heaters offer a great deal of warmth and can completely transform the coldest areas of your house into the most comfortable. They also put out lots of concentrated heat, and many of them feature grills or open flames that burn hot enough to scald a person or to catch loosely hanging fabrics or drapes on fire. There are some words of caution about these heaters if you want to virtually eliminate the possibility of fire damages to your residence.

The first step is to consider the placement of your heater very wisely. While it might require being close enough to an outlet to plug in, you should be mindful of the furniture and other objects in the room that could inadvertently make contact with the heater. With the excessive heat and open design of many of the small room heaters, something left too close to the heat could catch on fire (even without directly touching).

As many of our experienced SERVPRO team would tell you, preventing fire damage is often as simple as walking yourself through all of the scenarios that might happen. People do not intend to set their homes on fire, but these accidents can happen with a lack of foresight. As an added precaution, you should not leave these types of heaters on unattended in a room that you are not currently occupying.

While regrettable, house fires and small incidents do occur when using space heaters. While it might not be significant enough to force you to leave the house, sometimes the remains of the soot or the lingering odor of burned materials can be more than you can repair or remedy on your own. Our fire restoration team is equipped with deodorizing equipment to neutralize smoke and foul odors, and our commitment to mitigating your loss ensures that we restore the damage promptly.

No matter what degree of fire damage you might have to deal with, you can trust us at SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park to make it right. Call us 24/7 at (707) 588-8226.

Dangers of Frying A Turkey

12/13/2017 (Permalink)

Frying a turkey should never be performed in an enclosed area

In recent years deep-frying turkeys has become increasingly popular. The cooking method requires placing the turkey in 3 gallons or more of oil, heated by propane. 

The SERVPRO warns that cooking with deep-fat turkey fryers can be very dangerous as they have a high risk of tipping over, overheating, or spilling hot oil and could lead to fires, burns, or other injuries.

5 Dangers of Frying a Turkey
Here are 5 dangers associated with deep frying a turkey, according to SERVPRO:

  • A small amount of cooking oil coming into contact with the burner can cause a large fire.
  • An overfilled cooking pot or partially frozen turkey will cause cooking oil to spill when the turkey is inserted.
  • The sides of the cooking pot, lid and pot handles can get dangerously hot, creating severe burn hazards.
  • Units can easily tip over, spilling hot cooking oil over a large area.
  • Without thermostat controls, deep fryers have the potential to overheat the oil to the point of combustion.


Turkey Frying Safety Tips

SERVPRO advises against using a turkey fryer. If you decide to do it anyway, these precautions should be followed. Please follow these tips to stay safe: 

  • Do not overfill the fryer.
  • Fryers should always be used outdoors, on a solid level surface a safe distance from buildings and flammable materials.
  • If a turkey fryer fire occurs, call 911 immediately.
  • Keep all-purpose fire extinguishers nearby.
  • Make sure the turkey is completely thawed before it is placed in a fryer.
  • Never leave the fryer unattended because, without thermostat controls, the oil will continue to heat until it catches fire.
  • Never let children or pets near the fryer when in use or after use as the oil can remain hot for hours.
  • Never use a fryer on a wooden deck, under a patio cover, in a garage or enclosed space.
  • Use well-insulated potholders or oven mitts and wear long sleeves and safety goggles to protect from splatter.

About SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.  SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park has the experience and training to make your home safe and livable again. Call us at 707-588-8226 to learn more about our professional cleanup services.

Understanding the Different Types of Smoke Damage

8/21/2017 (Permalink)

Knowing the different types of smoke and their behavior patterns are vital to proper cleanup and restoration.

After the fire truck leaves, your Rohnert Park home likely suffers from a serious smoke and soot damage.  Smoke damage can exist in many forms and each type can have different levels of impact on your property and require different method for restoration.  Since smoke and soot is very invasive, they can penetrate into materials causing discoloration and odors, and can leave behind residue buildup.  SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park professionals are thoroughly trained in fire cleanup and restoration.  Our technicians know the different types of smoke and their behavior patterns, which is vital to proper restoration.

Smoke and Soot Facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

  • Dry Smoke Residue– Dry smoke residue occurs during fast burning fires that burn at a high temperature. Dry smoke residue is generally dry, powdery, and does not smear much.
  • Wet Smoke Residue-Wet smoke residue occurs from smoldering fires with low heat. Dry smoke residue is sticky with strong smoke odors. During cleaning, wet smoke residue can smear, making cleanup more difficult.
  • Protein Residue– Protein residue is essentially invisible and it can discolor paints, varnishes, and other finishes. Although this residue is not very visible, it has a very strong smell.
  • Fuel / Oil Residue– Fuel oil residue rarely comes from fires unless petroleum products were being stores on site. More commonly fuel and oil residue restoration comes from furnace puff backs that cause a fuel oil soot. This can be relatively sticky and difficult to clean.
  • Other Types – Tear gas, fingerprinting powder and fire extinguisher residue.

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Us Today – (707) 588-8226

Wildfire Prevention and Safety Tips

8/15/2017 (Permalink)

If your home or business is damaged by wildfires, SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park can help restore your property to preloss condition.

Wildfires can occur at anytime and anywhere throughout the year.  Late summer and early fall is typically the peak time for wildfires in California.  People that live or work in an area prone to wildfires are at greater risk.  Wildfires sometimes start naturally by heat ignited from sun light or lightning strikes.  However, majority of the wildfires in the U.S. are caused by humans.  Some human-caused fires result from campfires left unattended, negligently discarded cigarettes or intentional acts of arson.  A wildfire can move as fast as 6.5 miles per hour in forest and 14 miles an hour in grassland, consuming trees, homes, natural resources, humans and everything in its path.  

By working together, we can make our residents and neighborhood safer from wildfires by taking safety precautions.  Here are some wildfire safety tips to help prevent wildfire from occurring.

Wildfire Safety Tips

  • Clear leaves and other debris from gutters, eaves, porches and decks. Remove dead vegetation from under your deck and within 10  feet  of the  house.  This prevents embers from igniting your home.
  • Remove anything stored underneath decks or porches. Screen or box-in areas below patios and decks with wire mesh to prevent debris from accumulating.
  • Ensure flammable materials (firewood stacks, propane tanks, dry vegetation) are more than 30 feet from your home or business's foundation and outbuildings.
  • Wildfire can spread to tree tops. If you have trees on your property, prune so the lowest branches are 6 to 10 feet from the ground.
  • Keep your lawn hydrated and maintained. If it is brown, cut it down to reduce fire intensity. Dry grass and shrubs are fuel for wildfire.
  • Inspect shingles or roof tiles. Replace or repair shingles that are loose or missing to prevent ember penetration.
  • Cover exterior attic vents with metal wire mesh no larger than 1/8 inch to prevent sparks from entering the home.
  • Enclose eaves and screen soffit vents using 1/8 mesh metal screening to prevent ember entry.

SERVPRO of Petaluma / Rohnert Park specializes in fire and water damage restoration. We have the specific damage restoration training, personnel, and equipment and can quickly restore your home to pre-fire condition.  Call us today 707-588-8226.

Grilling Safety Tips

5/26/2017 (Permalink)

Follow these simple grilling safety tips to keep your family and friend safe during the cookout season.

When the weather gets warmer, there’s nothing better than the smell of food on the grill. Grilling and cookouts are the most popular activities outdoor. It’s a great way to relax and have fun with family and friends. Weather the barbecuing takes place at the beach, picnic area, camping site or just out in the backyard, grilling can poses risk of fire if not handled properly. According to a (NFPA) National Fire Protection Association report, nearly 9,000 homes fires are caused by grilling in the US and close to half of all injuries involving grills are due to thermal burns. 

Causes of Grill Fires: 

The leading causes of grill fires were a failure to clean, having the grill too close to something that could catch fire and leaving the grill unattended. 

A leak or break was the leading cause for outside or unclassified grill fires. Leaks or break were primarily a problem with gas grills.

General Grilling Tips:

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors.
  • The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.
  • Never leave your grill unattended.

If you encounter fire damage during this cookout season, give SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park a call.  We're dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, has the training, equipment and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs. We’re close by and ready to respond immediately when you need us. We make disaster "Like it never even happened." Call us today at (707) 588-8226.

Fire Safety Tips When Cooking

5/26/2017 (Permalink)

Follow these fire safety tips, be alert and watch what you are cooking at all times.

As we look forward to the upcoming holiday season of Memorial Day, Independence Day and Labor day (to name a few) many of us will invite our family and friends to celebrate these major holidays.  These can be exciting especially preparing some delicious dishes for the party.  Whether you’re cooking indoor or outdoor, there is always a potential for fire hazard in the kitchen or in the backyard.  Did you know that U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 166,100 home structure fires that involved cooking equipment per year? The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking.  So before you turn on your stove, here are some fire safety tips prevention. 

Here's What You Need to Know:

• Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stove top.
• Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, boiling or broiling food.
• If you are simmering, baking or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the kitchen while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
• Keep anything that can catch fire—oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains—away from the stovetop.

What to Do During a Fire:

• Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire.
• Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number after you leave.
• For an oven fire turn off the heat and keep the door closed.
• If you try to fight the fire, be sure others are getting out and you have a clear way out.
• Keep a lid nearby when you’re cooking to smother small grease fires. Smother the fire by sliding the lid over the pan and turn off the stovetop. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled.

If you have the unfortunate experience of fire or smoke damage in your home or business call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park!

We are available 24 hours a day and are always Here to Help! Have Questions? Call Us Today – (707) 588-8226

What to Do and Don't Do After a Fire

11/1/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park have specialized fire and smoke damage restoration training and experience to quickly clean up and restore your home.

What You Can Do Until Help Arrives

The most important thing is to understand the risk to your safety and health even after the fire is out. The soot and dirty water left behind may contain things that could make you sick.

Here's What to Do and Don't Do After a Fire.

DO:

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean so as not to further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.
  • Clean and protect chrome with light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Wash houseplants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers

DON'T:

  • Attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professionals.
  • Attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting your SERVPRO Franchise Professionals.
  • Attempt to clean any electrical appliances (TV, sets, radios, etc.) that may have been close to fire, heat or water without first consulting an authorized repair services.
  • Consume any food or beverages that may have been stored close to fire, heat or water.  They may be contaminated.
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet.  The wiring may be wet or damaged and can cause electrical shock.
  • Send garments to the dry cleaner.  Improper cleaning may set in smoke odor.

If your home or business has been damaged by the fire, you may not know where to turn.  SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park is here to help restore your property to preloss condition and make it, "Like it never even happened!"  We are available 24 hours a day and can have a team of technicians out to your property in no time!

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (707) 665-0822

Safety Tips in Case of a Fire at Home

10/18/2016 (Permalink)

Important fire safety tips to help you and your family in case of a fire at home.

Important and useful safety tips in case of a fire at home

In case of a fire at your home, your priority is to get yourself and your family members out as quickly as possible.  There is no time to gather valuables.  Fire can spread out within seconds and in just a few minutes, it can become life-threatening.  

Don't attempt to extinguish any fire if there is a threat to your safety.  If you're unable to exit your home safely because of smoke or fire, remain in your room until it is safe to do so.  Keep door closed and await assistance from the fire department.

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire, smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park, we have the specific damage restoration training, personnel, and equipment and can quickly restore your home to pre-fire condition.  

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Give us a call at 707-665-0822. 

 

 

Winter Fire Safety Tips

10/11/2016 (Permalink)

Practicing the best fire safety is how you can be most prepared for unexpected disaster in the winter.

The winter season is just around the corner which means that home fires occur more often by unattended candles, space heaters, wood stoves and fireplaces.  

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park, we want to remind everyone to take simple steps to protect their homes and family from the danger of household hazards and heating equipment. Practicing the best fire safety is how you can be most prepared for unexpected disaster in the winter.

Here are some fire safety tips to prevent most heating related fires from happening:

  • Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater.
  • Have your chimneys and vents checked. If you light fires frequently, you need a chimney sweep service once a year. 
  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. 
  • Test smoke alarms. Make sure batteries are fresh. Place smoke alarms in the kitchen, laundry room and in bedrooms.
  • Beware of lit candles. Candles can set the mood for relaxation, and that's how they get forgotten or knocked over by kids or pets.
  • Beware of space heaters. Like fireplaces, people and pets should not be allowed to sit any closer than three feet.
  • Don't put space heaters near curtains, tablecloths or other fluttering fabrics.
  • Make sure the space heaters you buy have automatic shut-offs before reaching dangerous temperatures.

If you have the unfortunate experience of fire or smoke damage in your home or business call SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park!

We are available 24 hours a day and are always Here to Help! Have Questions? Call Us Today – (707) 665-0822

 

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

10/7/2016 (Permalink)

When a fire starts inside your oven, keep the door closed and turn it off immediately. The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames.

The kitchen is the source of many fire hazards because it's where heat, electricity, water and grease come together.  The most common type of fire is the grease fire.  A grease fire is extremely dangerous as it can get out of control quickly and spread from the stove throughout the kitchen and into other rooms of the house.

Common Causes of Kitchen Fires

  • Too high temperature in the fryer
  • Vegetable, more flammable, oils
  • Old, more flammable oil, in the deep fryer
  • Fat deposits in the flue and ventilation ducts
  • Misalignment sprinklers due to equipment moved around
  • Clogged melting links of the sprinklers leading to impaired function

Other types of kitchen fires include oven fire or the microwave.  When a fire starts, keep the door closed and turn off the oven.   The lack of oxygen will suffocate the flames. If continues to smoke like a fire use a fire extinguisher or call fire department.

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we are available 24 hours and 7 days a week.  Give us a call at 707-665-082.  We can help make any fire damage you are facing and make it, "Like it never even happened!"

Safety First When a BBQ is in Full Swing

7/28/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park 707-665-0822

With the warm weather coming up, a lot of folks will be using their BBQ grill.  SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park knows it's crucial that we are careful when a BBQ is in full swing.  Whether you are utilizing wood chips, charcoal briquettes, or propane to cook your feast, safety should always be your first priority.

Being safe can help avoid damages from fire and smoke. Our SERVPRO team is always ready to go help you whenever disaster strikes. We can help with smoke remediation, whether it be your home or your place of business, and we can respond quickly once we receive your call.

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we are available 24/7/365!  Give us a call, and we can help make any damage you are facing Like it Never Even Happened! 

707-665-0822

Fire Damage Restoration Services

7/7/2016 (Permalink)

Servpro of Petaluma/Rohnert Park (707) 665-0822

By providing timely response SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park can provide you with service like fire, smoke, and soot removal, contents claims inventory, and document restoration, and so much more.

We can respond immediately to your emergency with the expertise to handle your restoration or cleaning needs. We are a 24-Hour Emergency Service, are Faster to Any-Sized Disaster, are a team of highly trained restoration technicians, are Locally Owned and Operated, and are a trusted leader in the Restoration Industry. SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park is always ready to respond to your emergency needs!

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park knows the first 48 hours after a fire can make the difference between restoring versus replacing your property. We want to make your damages “Like it never even happened” and get your home or business up and running again.

If you have any questions give us a call 24hours a day, 7 days a week at (707) 665-0822

Safety Grilling Tips During the Summer

6/3/2016 (Permalink)

Servpro of Petaluma/Rohnert Park 707-665-0822

It is BBQ season and everyone is excited including us here at SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park! 

Summer means fun under the sun for us her in Northern California, and if your at the Beach, at the Russian River, or at home with your grill remember grill safety!  Here are some grilling safety tips.

General Grilling Tips

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors.
  • The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.
  • Never leave your grill unattended.

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we can handle any Fire, Smoke, Water damage you may incounter but we dont want you to have to call us for sudden fire or smoke damage. Be safe with your grill or bon fires, and remember your local SERVPRO is always Here to Help if you need it! 

Contact our 24/7 line at 707-665-0822 

Smoke and Fire Damages Restoration Services

4/1/2016 (Permalink)

Servpro of Petaluma/Rohnert Park (707) 665-0822

 

Winter happens to be the most common time of the year for fires in a residence, but fires start no matter the season. Having smoke damage from even a small fire like a pot left on a hot stove, can be just as damaging as a larger fire. Make sure you are taking preventative measures in your home or business! Fire safety is always important.

If you have fire or smoke damages to your property give SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park a call and we can answer any questions you have. We specialize on Fire, Water, Smoke, and Mold damages, you can rely on us to help restore your property.  

We are available 24 hours a day and can have a team of technicians out to your property in no time!

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park 24/7 line is 707-665-0822. 

SERVPRO can handle your Fire Damages

1/13/2016 (Permalink)

Servpro of Petaluma/Rohnert Park is always here to help!

SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park franchise professionals can take care of your fire damage. By providing timely response with our services, ranging from FIRE, SMOKE, and SOOT removal, to contents claims inventory, and document restoration, and so much more. At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we know the first 48 hours after a fire can make the difference between restoring versus replacing your property. 

We are always faster to any size disaster and will strive to make your damages "Like it never even happened".  Our technicians has advanced training, years of experience and equipment to quickly restore your home to pre-fire condition.   You can rely on us to make your property look its very best.

We are available 24-hours a day, 365 days a year!

If you have Fire, Smoke or Soot damage in your property, call us at 707-665-0822.  

Fire or Water Damage! We have you covered!

11/30/2015 (Permalink)

Servpro of Petaluma/Rohnert Park We make it "Like it never even happened"

At SERVPRO of Petaluma/Rohnert Park we provide 24-hour emergency service and are dedicated to being faster to any-sized disaster in Rohnert PArk, Cotati, Petaluma and surrounding cities! We can respond immediately to your emergency and have the expertise to handle your restoration or cleaning needs. We are:

  • 24-Hour Emergency Service
  • Faster to Any-Sized Disaster
  • Highly Trained Restoration Technicians
  • A Trusted Leader in the Restoration Industry
  • Locally Owned and Operated
  • Advanced Restoration and Cleaning Equipment

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (707) 665-0822

Residential Services

Whether your home needs emergency Fire Damage, Flood Damage or your upholstery cleaned, you can depend on us.  Our technicians have extensive cleaning and restoration training and can make your property look its best. Learn more about our residential services:

  • Water Damage Restoration
  • Fire Damage Restoration
  • Mold Remediation
  • Storm Damage Restoration
  • Cleaning Services
  • Building/Reconstruction Services

Commercial Services

There's never a convenient time for fire or Water damage to strike your Sonoma County commercial property. Every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. So when the need arises for fast professional cleaning or emergency restoration services we has the training and expertise to respond promptly with highly trained technicians to get your property back to business. Learn more about our commercial services by giving us a call today! 

Firing up the Grill

5/19/2015 (Permalink)

Tips for the summer

With the warm weather coming up, it's crucial that we are careful when a BBQ is in full swing. Being safe can help avoid fire and smoke damage that could result from carelessness. If something were to happen our SERVPRO team is ready to go to aid in fire damage loss and restoration. We also help with smoke cleanup in your property, whether it be your home or your place of business we can respond quickly and have a group ready to go shortly after we receive the call. It is important to know who to call when an emergency happens because you never know when disaster will strike.

Fire Damage Restoration

8/30/2013 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Restoration

SERVPRO of Petaluma - Rohnert Park beat the previous record for CE class attendees on August 28, 2013. Usually have 12 people attend, but the word seems to be going around that people enjoy our classes taught by our Marketing Director Josh Wikoff. This month we had 17 people attend our Fire Damage Restoration Education Course. Congratulations Josh! Your overall evaluation is 10.